Victoria's Secret

Registration Number
1076-1-1
Maker
Type of Object
Tags
Medium
Acrylic paint on polymer resin statue, polymer adhesive
Collection
Height
96.00cm
Depth
38.00cm
Width
36.00cm
When Made
Public Description: 

DAMP is a Melbourne based artist collective established in 1995. The group make groundbreaking artworks that address the relationship between artist and audience. In 1999 the group staged a histrionic series of conflicts, which escalated into a brawl in the gallery window of Gertrude Contemporary. In 2009 the group constructed a monumental faux-marble plinth on which local collectives could meet as part of APT6 at the Queensland Art Gallery. The current members of DAMP are Narelle Desmond, Sharon Goodwin, Debra Kunda and James Lynch.

DAMP produced Victoria’s Secret alongside a suite of ceramic based artworks, which on close inspection are a patchwork of broken fragments that form the basis of The Harrison Collection. The Harrison Collection and Victoria’s Secret, began with the simple gesture of breaking a plate. Each member of DAMP painted a fragment of this plate and it was glued back together. For two years DAMP gathered found objects, personal effects and references and transformed these into a sculptural patchwork. Each of the 40 or so objects in the series were a result of the collaboration, demarcated by individual hands. In the case of Victoria’s Secret, a ready-made statue was carved into pieces. DAMP members used the American cartoonist and musician Robert Crumb and a Bauhaus Tapestry as reference material for this piece.

Makers Statement: 
What was the process of making the work? Over this period we gathered found objects, personal effects and references which were then transformed into a sculptural patchwork. Each object resulted in a collaboration demarcated by individual hands. In the case of Victoria Secret, a ready made statue was carved up into pieces. Our source material was Robert Crumb and a Bauhaus Tapestry. As evidenced in the final assemblage, once carved up it can never return to its former state.